Managed Care
Disease
Management

Briefly Noted

MANAGED CARE June 2013. © MediMedia USA
News & Commentary

Briefly Noted

Last year, for the first time in over 50 years, America spent less on health care than it had in the previous year, according to a study by the IMS Institute of Healthcare Informatics. The price tag was still hefty — $325.8 billion —but it was 1 percent below 2011. Per capita, we spent $898, down $33 from 2011. Experts cite the expirations of patents for such blockbuster drugs as Lipitor and Zyprexa.... Wellness programs take a hit in a new Rand report, Reuters is reporting. Such programs have only modest success, according to the report, which collected data from about 600 employers with at least 50 workers. Al Lewis, founder of the Disease Management Purchasing Consortium, tells Reuters that the most motivated employees tend to sign up, making it impossible to gauge success. Lewis was more blunt when he talked to Managed Care in March, describing the wellness industry as made up..... Testicular cancer rates are on the rise, with the increase seen mostly among Hispanic men, according to new research. The information comes from a national epidemiology database. Researchers tracked testicular cancer rates from 1992 through 2009. The incidence of testicular cancer appears to be increasing very slowly but steadily among virtually all groups that were studied, Scott Eggener, MD, an associate professor of surgery at the University of Chicago tells HealthDay News. “The novel finding is that the most dramatic increase is in Hispanic men.” He does not know why that is.... Black and Hispanic women diagnosed with breast cancer are likely to wait longer to get treatment than white women, according to researchers at the University of California–Irvine. They can’t really say why it happens, as is also true for numerous other studies pointing to disparities in treatment along racial and/or ethnic lines. Researchers analyzed the records of 8,860 women age 15 to 39 who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 1997 and 2006. Eight percent of white women waited six weeks before getting treatment; 15 percent of black and Hispanic women waited the same amount of time.