Managed Care
Disease
Management

Disease Management

Contributing Voices
Neil Minkoff, MD

Neil Minkoff, MDResearchers in Britain recently published a paper in Pediatrics showing a dramatic swing in admissions for childhood asthma after indoor smoking was banned by the British in 2007. A hospitalization trend that had been steadily around 2% fell to minus 9%. The trend was sustained.  10.1542/peds.2012-2592

Contributing Voices
Steven Peskin, MD

With apologies to James Taylor, I was recently introduced to a UNC-Chapel Hill professor of psychology, Dr. Edwin Fisher, from my alma mater and the university where the famous singer/ songwriter's father was dean of the School of Medicine. The work that Dr. Fisher is doing under the aegis of the American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation is on target for the Triple Aim.

Peers for Progress, designs, implements, and evaluates peer coach or peer educator programs worldwide. There are ample examples of successful and established programs led or facilitated by peer coaches, motivators, educators, or others, including Alcoholics Anonymous, Mended Hearts, and Weight Watchers. Peers for Progress is building a global network of peer-support organizations that are making a difference in the health of and lives of people affected by a range of health problems and their associated impact on the individual and on communities.

News & Commentary
Al Lewis
Al Lewis
Contributing Voices
Archelle Georgiou, MD

In 1995, Dr. Michael Rich published an article in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) that fueled the start of an industry. In a randomized, controlled trial, he showed that an investing in proactive disease management (DM) activities could decrease the cost and improve the quality of life for patients with congestive heart failure.

The premise of disease management seemed intuitive:

Carol Milano
Contributing Voices
Al Lewis

When an employer group shifts from one health plan to another, why not allow them to take their claims data to the next health plan? That way, the new plan would gain immediate knowledge of the specific disease burden faced by its new members and be able to act accordingly vis-à-vis care management programs and other interventions. As it stands now, the new plan would have to wait many months and even then would lack the history that the earlier plan no longer needs. And when the new plan “finds out" about a member's condition, it might be due to a claim for an event that could have been prevented had the carrier had access to the earlier data.

Here’s how the system would work. When a group signs up with a carrier, it could reserve the right to have its data transferred if it changes carriers. Obviously, it wouldn’t be able to “see” its own patient-identified data any more than it does now, but the data would accompany the change of carriers.

Bob Kirsch
Bob Kirsch
Al Lewis

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HealthIMPACT Southeast Tampa, FL January 23, 2015