Managed Care

 

Blogs

Contributing Voices
Steven Peskin, MD
In my Saturday morning Torah study, we focused on Jacob’s “settling in” with his family. After years of struggle, Jacob becomes complacent, comfortable. We discussed whether Jacob’s complacency — his relative inaction — contributed to the animosity that led Joseph’s brothers to sell him into slavery and to report to their father that his then youngest son had been killed.

Contributing Voices
Steven Peskin, MD

Mark Herzlich, Boston College All American linebacker and now New York Giants rookie, believes that positive thinking played an important part in his successful battle "to beat bone cancer" and return to football. World-renowned cyclist and cancer advocate Lance Armstrong credits not only topnotch medical care but also positive thinking in his overcoming testicular cancer. Armstrong stated on CBS Sunday Morning, "You can't deny the fact that a person with a positive and optimistic attitude does a lot better." Like the vast majority of individuals polled on whether or not the positive thinking can influence cancer outcomes, I believed/wanted to believe that positive thinking would be correlated with better survival data. But the weight of evidence does not support the thesis that optimistic attitude trumps the Big C, or even influences oncology outcomes.

Contributing Voices
Steven Peskin, MD

Steven Peskin MDAmericans’ girth is growing at an alarming rate. Many are too sedentary, too stressed, suffering from insomnia, making bad food choices. The drumbeat of “We need a culture of health versus a sickness culture” is a refrain that we now often hear and that I have espoused.

Contributing Voices
John Marcille

I was just looking at the website of Newtek Business Services (www.thesba.com/), which also goes by the name of The Small Business Authority. It sells financial and administrative services to small businesses. I found more evidence that the public doesn’t have a clue about what’s going on in health care. This is goofy stuff, folks, so I'll have some fun with it.

Contributing Voices
Steven Peskin, MD

Steven Peskin MD"You Can't Outrun Your Past"........ The title of a slide in a grand rounds presentation by Dr. David Kountz, senior VP for medical and academic affairs at Jersey Shore Medical Center and professor of medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. The subtext is that the impact of being black in our society confers incremental risk across a range of cardiovascular and cardiometabolic conditions irrespective of socioeconomic status.

Contributing Voices
Robert Goldberg

Robert M. Goldberg

There has been a lot of discussion of the Food and Drug Administration’s decision to revoke approval for the use of Avastin in metastatic breast cancer. Most of it takes at face value FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg’s 69- page decision in which she claims that the “objective” evidence of benefit did not exist to support approval relative to the serious side effects of the drug.

Contributing Voices
Steven Peskin, MD

Steven Peskin MDA recent conversation reminded me of the forgotten population in health care — the non-utilizers. I was speaking with a physician leader in Lancaster, Pa., about his program that emulates the good work of Dr. Jeff Brenner and his team in Camden, N.J., that has targeted the 1 percent of patients responsible for 30 percent of the cost.

Contributing Voices
John Marcille

I was amused and somewhat unsettled when I heard of Kaggle, a company with a novel approach to data analysis. As I understand it, Kaggle is a middleman between companies that have large amounts of data and are looking for certain kinds of analysis and the people or companies that can provide that analysis. But with a twist.

Contributing Voices
Steven Peskin, MD

Steven Peskin MDThree times during the past month a friend has asked for advice regarding his/her personal health care or that of a family member out of frustration and concern stemming from not receiving clear communication/information about the health problem(s). This scenario is all too common.

Contributing Voices
Paul Terry

Paul Terry, PhD The Affordable Care Act codified the worksite wellness exemption to the federal medical underwriting provisions in the group health plan market. This means companies are allowed to use an “outcomes-based” incentive model that provides financial rewards for those who satisfy a prescribed health standard such as a BMI of less than 30 or who meet a “reasonable alternative standard” or obtain a waiver from their physician. What some see as “rewards” others view as penalties or surcharges and, given the absence of evidence to confirm the role of such incentives in actually improving population health, the new provisions have unleashed a debate about the ethics and putative effectiveness of the new provisions.

Pages

Meetings

4th Partnering With ACOs Summit Los Angeles, CA October 27–28, 2014
PCMH & Shared Savings ACO Leadership Summit Nashville, TN November 3–4, 2014
2014 Annual HEDIS® and Star Ratings Symposium Nashville, TN November 3–4, 2014
Medicare Risk Adjustment, Revenue Management, & Star Ratings Fort Lauderdale, FL November 12–14, 2014
World Orphan Drug Congress Europe 2014 Brussels, Belgium November 12–14, 2014
Healthcare Chief Medical Officer Forum Alexandria, VA November 13–14, 2014
Home Care Leadership Summit Atlanta, GA November 17–18, 2014
HealthIMPACT Southeast Tampa, FL January 23, 2015