Michael Schlosser, MD
Felix Lee, MD
There are some success stories. Lowe’s pioneering flat-rate deal with the Cleveland Clinic for heart surgery has shown both cost savings and quality improvement. Other large employers, notably Walmart and PepsiCo, have followed suit, signing contracts with self-described, single-hospital “centers of excellence” for a handful of elective procedures.

Carter Paine
naviHealth

Carter Paine
Areas of the country with high concentrations of long-term acute care hospitals or inpatient rehabilitation facilities often have much higher utilization rates, even if a skilled nursing facility or home health provider could provide care comparable in quality and at a much lower price.

Zachary Hafner
Advisory Board

Zachary Hafner
For both providers and payers, the time, effort, and resources dedicated to collecting and reporting data is exorbitant. While most reporting requirements are well intentioned, the proliferation is not adding value and—in some circumstances—does more harm than good.
Jason Duhon
CMS depends on encounter data submitted by state Medicaid programs to maintain the massive Medicaid Statistical Information System (MSIS), a database of claims, encounter data, and beneficiary eligibility information. Poor encounter data can hinder quality measurement in multiple ways.
Ted Slafsky, MPP & Robert Chapman, MD

In an era of rapidly escalating prices, the 340B drug discount program remains one of the few checks to keep medicine and medical care accessible to the underserved. Contrary to the recent column, "Payers Must Develop Strategies To Overcome 340B Hurdles," it is not being exploited by participating hospitals.

If it were, where exactly is the money?

Zachary Hafner
Advisory Board

Zachary Hafner
If you’re still bickering over rate hikes and contract minutiae, then you’re out of step with the new health care economy. In progressive markets, savvy payers and providers that work together rather than constantly bumping heads are pulling ahead at the expense of slow movers and status quo players.
Chuck Hayes

Nearly half (45%) of American adults have a chronic health condition and a quarter have more than one chronic illness. Patients readily admit they do a better job of taking care of themselves when they receive reminders and motivational messages from their health care providers.

Zachary Hafner
Advisory Board

Zachary Hafner
The transformation of health care is fundamentally altering the environment in which health systems function, placing the CMO squarely at the center of a new reality where concepts like value, population health management, and outcomes-based payment are becoming key drivers of success.

Michael Schlosser, MD

Michael Schlosser, MD
Physicians, more than anyone else, can influence peers when it comes to talking about evidence-based care, even when it runs counter to customary, but costly, practice patterns. The timing couldn’t be better to put physicians in this leadership role because of the growing use of value-based payment models.
Zachary Hafner
According to an analysis of Medicare data, 40% of cancer patients have one or more comorbidities and 15% have two or more, the most common of which are diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and congestive heart failure. These diseases can complicate cancer care on many levels.
Richard G. Stefanacci, DO
Donald Ohioma, MS
Perhaps ACOs may be the answer to striking the right balance between utilization and clinical outcomes. But there’s a problem. They are not responsible for the costs of drugs covered by Medicare Part D plans in their total cost of care, but they are responsible for the costs of negative outcomes if medical treatment is inadequate or goes awry.
Paul Terry

 A few days ago, I went to the “Poke-stop” in my small town of Waconia, Minnesota, (population 11,490) to learn why I was losing my Pokémon “gym battles” and, more importantly, to survey the growing numbers of twentysomethings exploring my community’s parks and landmarks. I met a group of 15 Waconians for the first time, and they were excited about describing how Pokémon Go had increased their activity levels, their awareness of our community’s history, and their engagement with others.

Saskia Siderow
Allison Silvers, MBA
Diane E. Meier, MD
Palliative care has become America’s fastest growing medical specialty. ere are now more than 6,500 physicians and 13,500 nurses certified in palliative care, and palliative care teams available in more than 80% of American hospitals with more than 50 beds.
Paul Terry

With the support of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 35 of us visited the Lincoln Cottage, a hilltop retreat overlooking D.C. where Lincoln found solace, but also connected more closely with people, during the Civil War. Our group was there to inaugurate a national dialogue on health equity. Later dubbed the “Lincoln Cottage Assembly,” we were welcomed by health futurist Jonathan Peck at the staircase Lincoln climbed every day to write about the most vexing issue of his time.

Jonathan Gavras, MD

Our country is in crisis. We have an epidemic on our hands that crosses geographic boundaries, socio-economic status, gender, and many other categories. According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine, drug overdoses kill nearly 50,000 Americans each year. The media is certainly putting a microscope on it. Legislators are acting on it. Every stakeholder in the medical delivery chain is analyzing it–and I encourage physicians and other prescribers to take a look at their role in the problem.

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